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Category Archives: money

I haven’t had the itch to blog in a while, but this list of 100 ideas has me feeling creative again.  Idea number 11 is to make a list of everything you purchase for a week.  Well I’ve been quite the little consumer lately, so this should be interesting:

  • mousse
  • body wash
  • straightening iron
  • melatonin
  • clothes: 2 dressy (dressy as in we don’t wear this to Chili’s) tops, 1 pair of fancy pants (not to Chili’s!), 1 pair of slacks, and 3 regular tops
  • jewelry: bracelet, ring (to match fancy stuff)
  • music from iTunes: John Mayer’s new album, Lady Gaga’s old album (hangs head in shame)
  • groceries: food n’stuff
  • beer
  • wine
  • gas
  • gift + card
  • ticket to a football game (plus tailgating supplies)
  • gum

I think the purpose of this exercise is to realize how much BS you buy, but mostly what I purchase is food.  Lunch, dinner, drinks, sandwiches.  Should I really buy less food?

Questions? Comments? Concerns?

What did you buy over the last week?

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I attended the Dallas Tea Party (T.E.A. = Taxed Enough Already)!

I do love a good political rally.  It was fun…I could only stay for about an hour though.  A girl can only take so much standing on concrete in heels.  So that was fun, it reminded me that my views on the current political situation are shared by thousands (perhaps millions) across the country.  Of course I am disappointed in the media coverage – in most cases the turnout is understated, or they are saying the movement is misguided (thanks, CNN).  Most of the coverage went to Fort Worth because governor Rick Perry showed up there.  I’m glad the Dallas rally didn’t have all the political election hoo-ha.  It was by the citizens, for the citizens and all that good stuff.

For those of you that don’t get it…let me try to sum it up for you.  We don’t like to have our hard-earned money given away to others.  We work hard for ourselves, not for others.  This time it’s not taxation without representation, it’s that our representation isn’t LISTENING.  Taxes are a necessary evil…but this is out of control.  O.O.C. I tell  ya!

The emcee, Mark Davis, quoted some things from Atlas Shrugged (a book I have started but have yet to finish…come on, it’s really really long!) that I would like to share. These can all be attributed to Ayn Rand (obviously).

I swear by my life, and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.

In other words – I work for myself, not for the lazy people (in Atlas Shrugged they are called the “moochers”).

So you think that money is the root of all evil? Have you ever asked what is the root of money? Money is a tool of exchange, which can’t exist unless there are goods produced and men able to produce them. Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal with one another must deal by trade and give value for value. Money is not the tool of the moochers, who claim your product by tears or of the looters, who take it from you by force. Money is made possible only by the men who produce. Is this what you consider evil?

In other words – money is necessary.  Get over it.  Get some of your own.



Peggy Noonan wrote this wonderful article for the Wall Street Journal and I thought I’d pass it along. I’ve only posted the end of the article – the majority of it is talking about how much Wall Street and New York City have changed over the last 4 months.

…There’s a sense that everyone’s digging in. President Obama has dug in on this stimulus bill: Pass it or see catastrophe. Republicans are dug in: Pass it and see catastrophe. The digging in is a way of showing certitude, and they’re showing certitude because they’re lost.
We hire politicians to know what to do about empty stores, job loss, and “Retail Space Available.” But they don’t, and more than ever we know they don’t.


And there’s something else, not only in Manhattan but throughout the country. A major reason people are blue about the future is not the stores, not the Treasury secretary, not everyone digging in. It is those things, but it’s more than that, and deeper.

It’s Sully and Suleman, the pilot and “Octomom,” the two great stories that are twinned with the era. Sully, the airline captain who saved 155 lives by landing that plane just right—level wings, nose up, tail down, plant that baby, get everyone out, get them counted, and then, at night, wonder what you could have done better. You know the reaction of the people of our country to Chesley B. Sullenberger III: They shake their heads, and tears come to their eyes. He is cool, modest, competent, tough in the good way. He’s the only one who doesn’t applaud Sully. He was just doing his job.

This is why people are so moved: We’re still making Sullys. We’re still making those mythic Americans, those steely-eyed rocket men. Like Alan Shepard in the Mercury rocket: “Come on and light this candle.”
But Sully, 58, Air Force Academy ’73, was shaped and formed by the old America, and educated in an ethos in which a certain style of manhood—of personhood—was held high.
What we fear we’re making more of these days is Nadya Suleman. The dizzy, selfish, self-dramatizing 33-year-old mother who had six small children and then a week ago eight more because, well, she always wanted a big family. “Suley” doubletalks with the best of them, she doubletalks with profound ease. She is like Blago without the charm. She had needs and took proactive steps to meet them, and those who don’t approve are limited, which must be sad for them. She leaves anchorwomen slack-jawed: How do you rough up a woman who’s still lactating? She seems aware of their predicament.

Any great nation would worry at closed-up shops and a professional governing class that doesn’t have a clue what to do. But a great nation that fears, deep down, that it may be becoming more Suley than Sully—that nation will enter a true depression.